Baiju Khanchandani

Principle, Chiropratica SBT
  • Chiropratica SBT
  • Italy

Recent Comments

May 13, 2019
Replying to Baiju Khanchandani

Regarding the question, balance between hard skills and soft skills, and the five point summary for soft skills in the article (adaptability, cultural competency, empathy, intellectual curiosity, 360° thinking), a functional neurology and cognitive neuroscience approach to the problem/opportunity is opportune. The acquisition of skills, hard or soft, falls under the neuroscience of learning (great 1 hour video summary on Linked In...); and the five soft skills are all functions of various areas and networks in the brain. Behavioural Economics researchers have been awarded 4 of the last 11 Nobel prizes for Economics, so it time to transfer the neuroscience and the economics to the shop and office floor. 

The most cost-effective and brain targetting neuro-hack is exercise integrated into the working week and advice to workers on brain and body health: health and safety in the home, nutrition (start with the vending machine), sleep ergonomics and dynamics for example.  What is the point of an expensive office chair if the worker slumps on a 20 year old sofa for 4 hours a night at home eating crisps?

Once brain and body health are being addressed in this way a number of smartphone Apps exist to benchmark progress.  The Apps and questionnaires can be used to test workers at the outset of a wellness promotion programme and Highmark EQ in particular can be used to train workers and they can spot dips in brain function and seek help before work becomes a problem or symptoms manifest. 

Exercise, nutrition, sleep, home ergonomics, the use of brain training apps can make brains more adaptable by promoting neuroplasticity, and empathy and intellectual curiosity and holistic/whole brain thinking all benefit. Cultural competency is more a cultural competency.  

Here is a recent reference that I have yet to archive on my hardrive.  It describes exercise as "neurotherapy" because of the cognitive advantage; lots of great references at the end. 

https://www.the-scientist.com/features/this-is-your-brain-on-exercise-64934

Kahneman is an Economics Nobel Prize Laureate with easy to read - and apply - books.  Matteo Motterlini, and Italian philosopher and neuroscientist has put many of the concepts of behavioural economics in books popular with the public- but in Italian. 

And Johnson and Johnson has one of the best developed Corporate Wellness programmes with a 30 year track record. Obviously, the best programmes include a chiropractor on the staff!

May 12, 2019

Regarding the question, balance between hard skills and soft skills, and the five point summary for soft skills in the article (adaptability, cultural competency, empathy, intellectual curiosity, 360° thinking), a functional neurology and cognitive neuroscience approach to the problem/opportunity is opportune. The acquisition of skills, hard or soft, falls under the neuroscience of learning (great 1 hour video summary on Linked In...); and the five soft skills are all functions of various areas and networks in the brain. Behavioural Economics researchers have been awarded 4 of the last 11 Nobel prizes for Economics, so it time to transfer the neuroscience and the economics to the shop and office floor. 

The most cost-effective and brain targetting neuro-hack is exercise integrated into the working week and advice to workers on brain and body health: health and safety in the home, nutrition (start with the vending machine), sleep ergonomics and dynamics for example.  What is the point of an expensive office chair if the worker slumps on a 20 year old sofa for 4 hours a night at home eating crisps?

Once brain and body health are being addressed in this way a number of smartphone Apps exist to benchmark progress.  The Apps and questionnaires can be used to test workers at the outset of a wellness promotion programme and Highmark EQ in particular can be used to train workers and they can spot dips in brain function and seek help before work becomes a problem or symptoms manifest. 

Exercise, nutrition, sleep, home ergonomics, the use of brain training apps can make brains more adaptable by promoting neuroplasticity, and empathy and intellectual curiosity and holistic/whole brain thinking all benefit. Cultural competency is more a cultural competency.  

Dec 28, 2017

The advancement of the digital age has paid an efficiency dividend and created new jobs while displacing others. The dark cloud on the horizon is automation and Artificial Intelligence.  Humans in some sectors fear losing their jobs to robots and software even as re-shoring gathers pace and outsourcing slows.  In the blur of technological advancement the law of diminishing returns is revealing itself in some sectors, particularly health. There is a limit to the benefits of increased numbers MRI scanners in the population.  It is time to examine how processes such as Lean and new and emerging knowledge based professions such as chiropractic can be bring efficiency and improved health outcomes.

Health forms 10-18% of advanced economies and is a major employer in a sector dear to people.    Prevention is a core plank of health policy - but OECD data shows that, depending on the measure, barely a fraction of healthcare spending is on prevention. It is time to look at how a focus on knowledge based professions can return to centre stage, and how new and emerging health professions can enrich the health workforce skill set in areas such as prevention and performance to face the demographic challenge of an age-ing population.

An idea for the OECD Forum agenda item is to examine how the health economic sector can shift its focus towards new and emerging knowledge based professions, with hands-on skills, competence in areas of prevention and health promotion, particularly in un-exotic areas such as the care and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders such as low back pain - ranked as top causes of disability by the Global Burden of Disease. An examination of the workforce sector would look at barriers to entry, regulation, competition and other issues touched upon in the OECD document, Enhancing Beneficial Competition in Health Professions. 

Another area to examine is how best practice and knowledge from other economic sectors such as Lean processes can be translated to the health sector.  Error rates accepted in the health sector would be considered scandalous in other sectors. 

Nov 28, 2017

A commendable approach that will promote corporate wellness programmes. These are still rare. And should initially focus on musculoskeletal conditions and prevention. New and innovative approaches include chiropractic care and other low tech knowledge based approaches which embrace a healthy brain paradigm. A good place to start is to check the goods on sale in the company vending machines and cafeteria!