Pew Research Center: Presentation from the OECD Forum Virtual Event "Communicating on public health and vaccines in a climate of mis/disinformation"

The slides from Cary Funk's presentation are available here to view and download.

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As part of an OECD Forum series, the Virtual Event “Communicating on public health and vaccines in a climate of mis/disinformation” took place on Thursday, 19 November.

We discussed how in this context of profound changes and uncertainty, the development of the COVID-19 vaccine is seen as both a crucial step towards recovery and as a trigger for polarising conversations. Indeed, building and sustaining confidence in a potential vaccine is another battle yet to be won. Over the past few months, the rise in anti-vaccination protests across the world has shown the extent to which some segments of society see the COVID-19 vaccine as a threat rather than a lifesaving solution. In addition, the foreseen fast tracking of a COVID-19 vaccine is also triggering suspicion beyond anti-vaxx circles.

The slides from Cary Funk's presentation are available here to view and download.

Cary Funk

Director of Science and Society Research, Pew Research Center

Cary Funk is director of science and society research at Pew Research Center, where she leads the Center’s efforts to understand the implications of science for society. The Center studies the social, ethical and policy implications of scientific developments in areas such as climate and energy, emerging issues in genetic engineering, and food and space science. She has authored or co-authored a number of reports focused on public trust in science, scientific experts and science news and information. Funk has broad expertise in public opinion research and has specialized in public understanding of science issues for nearly two decades. Prior to joining Pew Research Center, she directed the Virginia Commonwealth University Life Sciences Surveys, national surveys on science and biotechnology. Funk began her career at CBS News in New York working on preelection polling and analysis of exit polls. She earned a doctorate and a master’s in social psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

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