Our Failure to Protect: Political commitment is vital to prevent and respond to young newcomers going missing in Europe

Banner image: Free To Use Sounds on Unsplash

Go to the profile of Aagje Ieven
Nov 26, 2019
0
0

This article is part of the Forum Network series on New Societal Contract and International Co-operationThe Forum Network is the place for you to debate policies that can shape the issues and challenges of our time with other experts and engaged citizensJoin for free using your email or social media accounts to share your stories, ideas and expertise in the comments!



It is 2015, and Europol have sent a shockwave through Europe with news that, according to national reports, at least 10,000 unaccompanied migrant children have gone missing; today, we know that this was only the tip of the iceberg. Between 2014 and 2017, at least 30,000 young newcomers, escaping violence or poverty in their home countries, disappeared on European soil (Source: European Migration Network). Children going missing in migration risk facing exploitation, violence, starvation, homelessness and physical and mental health problems. Our failure to protect them from such risks is a violation of their fundamental rights.


Get more facts and compare your country on the OECD Migration Data Portal

About half of these children go missing from asylum centres or shelters within two days of their arrival. Young newcomers feel compelled to leave because reception centre conditions are poor and inappropriate for children, and they hope to find happier, safer housing elsewhere. Sometimes children leave centres because they become discouraged by the length and complexity of asylum or family reunification procedures, or because they fear being sent home or back to the EU country where they first arrived. (Source: Missing Children Europe and University of Portsmouth SUMMIT study 2016). 

Missing Children Europe and University of Portsmouth SUMMIT study 2016

In many cases, they are forced to leave because they are, or become, victims of trafficking, including labour and sexual exploitation, forced begging and drug smuggling. Europol has intelligence that human traffickers are increasingly targeting children in migration, particularly when unaccompanied. Young newcomers lack trustworthy information and are subject to disinformation on their rights and options. 


Listen to more OECD Podcasts and Follow us to never miss a track!

Despite the enormous risks to which unaccompanied migrant children are exposed, disappearances are usually underreported. The majority of EU countries do not have legal or procedural regulations on investigations into the disappearances of migrant children, and some have a fixed no-action period before any activity on the case is considered. (Source: Missing children in the European Union Mapping, Data Collection and Statistics, 2013).

As a society, we accept that these children are treated with lower priority because they are foreigners. If they were European, it’s doubtful we would accept situations like these.

Speaking the Language of Silence: Revealing the language-development blind spot in building early-childhood resilience by HRH Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands, Chair of the European Commission’s High Level Group of Experts on Literacy; Special Envoy on Literacy for Development, UNESCO

Speaking the Language of Silence: Revealing the language-development blind spot in building early-childhood resilience by HRH Princess Laurentien of the Netherlands, Chair of the European Commission’s High Level Group of Experts on Literacy; Special Envoy on Literacy for Development, UNESCO

This is one of the reasons why children in migration made up only 4.1% of the cases reported to Missing Children Europe’s member network of 116,000 hotlines in 2018 (Figures and Trends from hotlines for missing children, 2018). That said, young newcomers make up more than 25% of the cross-border missing cases. Lack of co-ordination between services at the national level, as well as across borders is another reason why children disappear. In many cases, international tools for tracing missing children, such as our hotline network and the SIS or Interpol Yellow notices, are not being tapped into for this specific group. As a society, we accept that these children are treated with lower priority because they are foreigners. If they were European, it’s doubtful we would accept situations like these.

Missing Children Europe: Figures and Trends 2018 from Hotlines for Missing Children and Cross-Border Family Mediators

Missing Children Europe aims to protect children against any harm that causes, or results from them going missing, mainly through research, training, cross-border co-ordination and advocacy.

We know what needs to be done to prevent and respond to children going missing in migration. Even so, the protection gaps remain stark, and the implementation of many of the actions foreseen at national and local level are still lagging behind. 

Our AMINA programme aims to improve responses across borders and prevention. With the Miniila app we are building a mobile application to give young newcomers access to child friendly, up to date and accessible information on their rights, procedures and the support available wherever they are. This way, rather than being forced to trust those profiting from their vulnerability, they are empowered to take safer decisions. Our forthcoming Interact handbook and training provides actors working with children with guidelines to better respond to the protection needs of children in migration, and work together across borders on the basis of trialled and tested procedures. Tiny and Apollo are two fictional characters who represent young newcomers in our newly launched communications campaign to create more positive discourse around children in migration and enhance integration. 


Quality guardianship gives children access to their rights and is key to integration, which is why we contributed to the Proguard toolkit and training. We need policy makers at the national and EU level to prioritise children in migration policies so all decisions regarding children are in their best interests, including those related to law making and public funding. The Initiative for Children in Migration advocates jointly with other migration, asylum and child protection actors for changes in EU law and policy to protect children in migration. In addition, we have organised three editions of the Lost in Migration conference, bringing together young newcomers, key stakeholders, on the ground response services and policy makers.

Read the full OECD report Changing the Odds for Vulnerable Children: Building Opportunities and Resilience or the executive summary

OECD Report Changing the Odds for Vulnerable Children: Building Opportunities and Resilience

We know what needs to be done to prevent and respond to children going missing in migration. Since the adoption of the EC Communication on Children in migration, more investments have been made – by member states and NGOs – to support children in migration in different domains. Even so, the protection gaps remain stark, and the implementation of many of the actions foreseen at national and local level are still lagging behind. What is lacking is political commitment to both prevention and responses.

Related Topics

Child Well-being Migrants’ Integration

Your comments are what make the Forum Network the unique space it is, connecting citizens, experts and policy makers in open and respectful debate. Whether you agree, disagree or have another point of viewjoin for free using your email or social media accounts and comment below

Go to the profile of Aagje Ieven

Aagje Ieven

Secretary General, Missing Children Europe

Aagje has a background in Health (Bachelor, Leuven 1998) and Political Philosophy (Master, Leuven and Nijmegen, 2002) and conducted research in Human Rights at the University of Leuven (2002-2008) and Columbia University in New York (Fulbright Scholarship 2007). Since 2009, she has worked for a number of EU civil society organisations as a policy analyst and advocate for the rights and wellbeing of children and their families. She previously coordinated an advocacy campaign for the rights of children in vulnerable situations and most recently managed a European membership network supporting families affected by mental health issues. Aagje joined Missing Children Europe as Secretary General in November 2018. She is responsible for the strategic development and day-to-day management of the organization.

No comments yet.